Аннотация

In 1913, Rabindranath Tagore became the first non-European to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, and he remains one of the most important voices of Bengali culture to this day.These short stories, written mostly in the 1890s, vividly portray Bengali life and culture. Tagore’s treatment of caste culture, bureaucracy and poverty paint a vivid portrait of nineteenth-century India, and all are interwoven with Tagore’s perceptive eye for detail, strong sense of humanity and deep affinity for the natural world.Tagore’s stories continue to rise above geographic and cultural boundaries to capture the imaginations of readers around the world.

Аннотация

"This lyrical drama… is based on the following story from the Mahabharata. In the course of his wanderings, in fulfilment of a vow of penance, Arjuna came to Manipur. There he saw Chitr?ngad?, the beautiful daughter of Chitrav?hana, the king of the country. Smitten with her charms, he asked the king for the hand of his daughter in marriage. Chitrav?hana asked him who he was, and learning that he was Arjuna the Pandara, told him that Prabhanjana, one of his ancestors in the kingly line of Manipur, had long been childless. In order to obtain an heir, he performed severe penances. Pleased with these austerities, the god Shiva gave him this boon, that he and his successors should each have one child. It so happened that the promised child had invariably been a son. He, Chitrav?hana, was the first to have only a daughter Chitr?ngad? to perpetuate the race. He had, therefore, always treated her as a son and had made her his heir. Continuing, the king said: «The one son that will be born to her must be the perpetuator of my race. That son will be the price that I shall demand for this marriage. You can take her, if you like, on this condition.» Arjuna promised and took Chitr?ngad? to wife, and lived in her father's capital for three years. When a son was born to them, he embraced her with affection, and taking leave of her and her father, set out again on his travels."—From the Preface.

Аннотация

"Gitanjali", or Song Offerings, is a collection of poems translated by the author, Rabindranath Tagore, from the original Bengali. This collection won the Nobel prize for Tagore in 1913. This volume includes the original introduction by William Butler Yeats that accompanied the 1911 English language version. «Gitanjali» is a collection of over 100 inspirational poems by India's greatest poet.

Аннотация

Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941), the first non-European to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature (1913), was a Bengali poet, novelist, musician, painter and playwright. Tagore modernized Bengali art and literature by rejecting classical forms, and produced strongly poetic and spiritual works. He spoke largely to political and personal topics as he rejected the British Raj and supported independence. His 1916 novel, «The Home and the World», illustrates a multitude of conflicts between tradition and the modern world, religion and nationalism, and the struggle Tagore felt within himself. The novel centers on the Swadeshi movement, and warns characters against the danger of such a movement becoming violent. Sandip, the spirited leader of the movement who strives for freedom at any cost, meets the passive, non-violent Nikhil and his young, unsuspecting wife, Bimala. A love triangle ensues amidst the turmoil of a revolution that may do the country more harm than good.

Аннотация

"Sadhana: The Realisation of Life" is Rabindranath Tagore's excellent collection of essays on the subject of Indian spirituality. Tagore's objective in this work was to give the reader an understanding not only of the scripture but as to the practice, as he writes, «So in these papers, it may be hoped, western readers will have an opportunity of coming into touch with the ancient spirit of India as revealed in our sacred texts and manifested in the life of to-day.»

Аннотация

Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941), the first non-European to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature (1913), was a Bengali poet, novelist, musician, painter and playwright. Tagore modernized Bengali art and literature by rejecting classical forms, and produced strongly poetic and spiritual works. In addition to his original writings, Tagore's translations have been revered throughout both the Eastern and Western worlds, earning him the respect of such literary figures as W.B. Yeats, Ezra Pound, and Gandhi protégé, Charles F. Andrews. Tagore translated the «Songs of Kabir» in 1915; his poetic writing style and prophet-like persona contribute to the spiritual nature of the work. Kabir (1440-1518) was a mystic poet and saint of India who inspired the Kabir Panth, a religious community, one of the Sant Mat sects, of nearly ten million members. His poetry integrates the philosophies of Sufism, Hinduism and the Kabbalah, accepting the concepts of reincarnation and Karma, as well as the affirmation of a single god and the rejection of the cast system and idolatry.

Аннотация

First published in English in 1912, “Gitanjali”, or “Song Offerings”, is a collection of poems translated by the author, Rabindranath Tagore, from the original Bengali. It contains over 100 inspirational poems by India’s greatest poet and earned Tagore the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913. Tagore, known as the “Bard of Bengal”, was born in 1861 to a wealthy family and started writing poetry as a child and began publishing critically acclaimed verses as a teenager. Tagore went on to write novels, stories, and dramas, work which would reshape Bengali literature and culture. He first published the “Gitanjali” collection of poems, widely considered to be one of his best works, in his native Bengali language in 1911. The original Bengali version contained over 150 verses and many were combined or edited out when Tagore translated them into English. Deeply spiritual and devotional, Tagore’s poems are primarily concerned with love and the conflict between earthly desires and spiritual passions and longings. Tagore also spoke eloquently and movingly of his connection to the natural world. This volume includes the introduction by William Butler Yeats that accompanied the original 1912 English language version. This edition includes a biographical afterword.

Аннотация

THIS lyrical drama was written about twenty-five years ago. It is based on the following story from the Mahabharata.<br><br>In the course of his wanderings, in fulfilment of a vow of penance, Arjuna came to Manipur. There he saw Chitrangada, the beautiful daughter of Chitravahana, the king of the country. Smitten with her charms, he asked the king for the hand of his daughter in marriage. Chitravahana asked him who he was, and learning that he was Arjuna the Pandara, told him that Prabhanjana, one of his ancestors in the kingly line of Manipur, had long been childless. In order to obtain an heir, he performed severe penances. Pleased with these austerities, the god Shiva gave him this boon, that he and his successors should each have one child. It so happened that the promised child had invariably been a son. He, Chitravahana, was the first to have only a daughter Chitrangada to perpetuate the race. He had, therefore, always treated her as a son and had made her his heir.

Аннотация

Civility is beauty of behaviour. It requires for its perfection patience, self-control, and an environment of leisure. For genuine courtesy is a creation, like pictures, like music. It is a harmonious blending of voice, gesture and movement, words and action, in which generosity of conduct is expressed. It reveals the man himself and has no ulterior purpose.<br><br>Our needs are always in a hurry. They rush and hustle, they are rude and unceremonious; they have no surplus of leisure, no patience for anything else but fulfilment of purpose. We frequently see in our country at the present day men utilising empty kerosene cans for carrying water. These cans are emblems of discourtesy; they are curt and abrupt, they have not the least shame for their unmannerliness, they do not care to be ever so slightly more than useful.

Аннотация

Darkly you sweep on, Eternal Fugitive, round whose bodiless rush stagnant space frets into eddying bubbles of light.<br><br>Is your heart lost to the Lover calling you across his immeasurable loneliness?<br><br>Is the aching urgency of your haste the sole reason why your tangled tresses break into stormy riot and pearls of fire roll along your path as from a broken necklace? Your fleeting steps kiss the dust of this world into sweetness, sweeping aside all waste; the storm centred with your dancing limbs shakes the sacred shower of death over life and freshens her growth.<br><br>Should you in sudden weariness stop for a moment, the world would rumble into a heap, an encumbrance, barring its own progress, and even the least speck of dust would pierce the sky throughout its infinity with an unbearable pressure. My thoughts are quickened by this rhythm of unseen feet round which the anklets of light are shaken.<br><br>They echo in the pulse of my heart, and through my blood surges the psalm of the ancient sea.